Friday, December 29, 2006

A Few Thoughts on WBW #29

By way of introducing Wine Blogging Wednesday #29, I’ll offer a few last quotes from my recent reading material.

In "Adventures on the Wine Route," Kermit Lynch quotes lengendary Burgundy winemaker Henri Jayer:

"We tend to count too much on science, when, before, people gave importance to natural things. One thing is certain, the ancients were not dumb, and if they established a tradition it was because of their experience, They tried to eliminate unfavorable elements and preserve what worked best.”

Almost twenty years later, in "A Hedonist in the Cellar," Jay McInerey writes this about Biodynamic vintner Robert Sinskey:

"Sinskey attributes the new subtlety of many California Chards in part to a new appreciation for the vineyard itself, and a de-emphasis on high-tech interventionist techniques."

I hope modern winemaking is moving towards reduced use of chemicals and artificial fertilizers. However, I do sympathize with winemakers and grape growers who do it in order to survive. We need to find a balance that we all, and the planet, can live with.

In any case, I’m happy to support winemakers and growers who listen to the earth and the vines, and treat them with respect. So without further ado, here is Wine Blogging Wednesday #29:

Biodynamic wines hosted by Fork and Bottle

See you on the 17th.

And, I promise. No more quotes.

1 comment:

Jack said...

"One thing is certain, the ancients were not dumb, and if they established a tradition it was because of their experience, They tried to eliminate unfavorable elements and preserve what worked best."

...This is my understanding how Biodynamics came to be. It's not like Steiner sat down one day and made this stuff up.

Also, your quotes are very good, so I doubt you're approaching the limit of "too many". :)

 
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